March 25, 2017

Keep the Whole Family Safe During Disasters

ImageEvery year we hear concerns about “an active hurricane season” or “perfect” conditions for wildfires.  These natural disasters can devastate families, including our pets.  But, legislation, along with a national campaign to proactively prepare for disasters, has not only provided needed relief and comfort, it’s helped keep families together!

No one will ever forget the images of a hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast or the bleak desolation of a wildfire.   Media inundates us with pictures of human misery and also the suffering and plight of the animals.  Abandoned pets, forcible separations, and video of dogs and cats desperate to survive have now been etched deeply into our memories.

After the disastrous 2005 hurricane season, new legislation mandating the accounting for people’s pets in disaster plans was proposed and enacted.   The Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS Act) was signed into law in 2006.   This bi-partisan initiative insures that any state asking for federal assistance in emergency situations must have plans for accommodating pets and service animals during evacuations.

Top Summertime Tips for Pet Safety

ImageSummertime!  Finally, your chance to relax and unwind!  With your sunblock, sunglasses and a good book, you plan to enjoy the day at the pool! Suddenly, you remember your dog is in the yard – unsupervised …surely he will be okay for a couple hours.  Or will he?

Summer temperatures might be great for tan lines and boating trips, but the excessive heat and increased outdoor activities could spell disaster for your pets.  As the mercury rises, take just a few moments to insure that your pets are safe and prevent an urgent trip to the animal ER with a summertime emergency!

The most common heat related problem for pets is heat stroke.  Also known as heat stress or hyperpyrexia, heat stroke is a real emergency for dogs.  Even on moderately warm days, an excited dog might show a body temperature increase of 2-5 degrees Fahrenheit.  Since dogs don’t sweat like we do, they are unable to dissipate the excess heat and heat stroke may soon follow.

Lyme Disease Takes Flight!

ImageEveryone knows that ticks, those creepy spider cousins, have the potential for carrying some pretty serious diseases to our pets.  But, what’s less well known is that these blood thirsty parasites may be arriving in your backyard after traveling by air!

Robins and many other songbirds are often the heralds of springtime and warmer weather just around the corner.  Unfortunately, a new report is stating these welcome spring visitors are quite possibly spreading a serious disease of humans and pets…Lyme Disease!

When most people think about Lyme Disease, they automatically think about the eastern seaboard of the United States.  While it is true that states near Connecticut account for almost 90% of all cases reported, Lyme Disease can be found in all 50 states and is truly a global disease.